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One Year Of Feeding Children

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It amazes me how 2013 came and went in the blink of an eye and how things change. A little over a year ago, I wrote a blog post about how excited I was because I was offered a job as a communications coordinator at a local nonprofit. I was also in my senior year of college, living with my parents and with big plans ahead of me.

Right now, I sit in my room at my house listening to my roommate talk to her friend on the phone. My other roommate is in her room, screaming because she can’t sleep over the loud phone conversation.

To my left, on a pile of gold glitter I should’ve cleaned a while ago, sits my graduation cap. To my left sits a document titled “How To Do Everything by Veronica Figueroa.” This document holds every procedure that a communications coordinator at Feeding Children Everywhere could ever need. It was my holy book and I am now revising it and polishing it up for my new coworker who will be replacing me in March.

I never would’ve thought that a month after graduation I would be revising my resume and heading into the post graduation job search, but I guess everything I do is backwards.

Looking back on 2013, I can say I have been blessed to have been a part of the Feeding Children Everywhere team and I have experienced many wonderful things, as well as some scary ones that have now become life lessons. I loved that behind my job was a mission to raise awareness of the hunger epidemic around the world. I am proud that what I did for a living mobilized thousands of volunteers to package 7 million meals that were distributed to numerous food pantries across the nation as well as the Philippines, Africa and Haiti. And as proud and happy as I am of my accomplishments, I do not feel fulfilled and passionate about these things but I do believe that I was there for the season that I need to be. All the social media, press, marketing and campaigns, communications, fundraising and stepping into an intern manager role definitely helped shape me for my future career, whatever it may be.

It is now that I ask myself the question, “So, now what?”

I’m not sure if I’ve ever been in such a place of uncertainty in my life so this is new to me. Next month begins the job search and whether it may be marketing, social media or writing that I end up doing, I hope that it is something that I feel passionate about. I hope that I find something that if it were taken away, would break me.

I’ve been praying about this for a few days now and I have left this on God’s hands.

Until then.

Nonprofit Tech 2.0 Blog :: A Social Media Guide for Nonprofits

twitter-birds2If your nonprofit is not getting retweeted on Twitter, then you haven’t yet found your Twitter voice. Retweets ensure increased exposure of your nonprofit’s avatar which ultimately results in more followers and click-through rates. Twitter itself has concurred that influence on Twitter is not in how many followers you have, but rather in how often you get retweeted. You have to give your followers retweetable tweets! That said, as a follow-up to Five Types of Nonprofit Tweets Guaranteed to Get Retweeted, below are  five types of tweets that rarely, if ever, get retweeted:

1. Truncated automated tweets from Facebook.
Sorry nonprofits. There’s no short cuts in social media. Folks on Twitter don’t want to follow robots. They want to know there’s a human being behind your avatar.

ymca

2. Automated tweets announcing new photos posted on Facebook.
Who hasn’t seen this tweet many, many times on Twitter? No longer interesting and…

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Planning and God’s timing

Most of those who know me know that I write everything down on my planner. I can’t live without it and I feel lost when I leave it at home.

When I graduated high school in 2009, I sat down during the summer before college and planned out my life for the next two years. I worked hard, graduated on time and figured I’d do the same at UCF. I’ve worked hard, but I’m behind on classes because of my past internships so instead of graduating in May, I’ll be graduating in December, God-willing.

[Quick update: I didn’t get the St. Petersburg Times summer internship that I had applied for. I wrote back to Nancy Waclawek, the Director of Corporate Giving, as well as Drew Harwell, a reporter there, and they both told me that I needed more breaking news experience. It was pretty saddening but I moved on.]

Now that I look back, I thank God that I didn’t get the Orlando Sentinel internship or the St. Petersburg Times internship because it wouldn’t have led me to Feeding Children Everywhere. I was taking social media classes while I was a social media intern there and I feel like these things went hand-in-hand.

I was recently offered a position there as a communications coordinator and I took it. I had been praying about job offers because I was so unsure about my stalled “career.” What was I going to do when I graduated? I had a small panic attack during the winter break and I was constantly anxious about my future. Thankfully, I got the answer to my prayers a month into my internship. They said that I worked hard and I made myself invaluable to them. Now I get paid to do something that I love (the internship was unpaid, for those of you who keep Google’ing if its paid or not)!

It’s just really funny that to me that I planned out my life at UCF and things didn’t go the way I wanted to. Then I planned out getting these internships and building my portfolio but that didn’t happen. Then I finally decided to let go, keep praying and focus on being the best that I can be. God works in mysterious ways so before questioning his timing, just let it be. Something good will work itself out.

Habbakuk 2:3 reads, “For still the vision awaits its appointed time; it hastens to the end—it will not lie. If it seems slow, wait for it; it will surely come; it will not delay.” God won’t make you wait for something that will suck. He is just waiting for the right moment to give you His gift.

Anyway, I’m really thankful for my new position at Feeding Children Everywhere and even though I just started there and I may feel overwhelmed by certain projects, I know that I can put all my trust in the Lord.

WRITING QUICKLY ABOUT DYING SLOWLY

So excited for this! I’ll probably blog about my experience about it next week. I wish our region had an SPJ chapter like this one.

journoterrorist

“Dying,” Woody Allen once said, “is one of the few things that can be done as easily lying down.”

Sadly, writing about death is harder than just sitting at a keyboard.

While journalism schools teach students how to cover city commission meetings and write personality profiles, I can’t find one major j-school that offers a class on obituaries.

And if you’re thinking, “Well, that’s because there are lot more important lessons to learn,” check out these actual classes…

  • At Columbia University, China Seminar will “sharpen the ways we think and write about the country as journalists.”
  • At the University of Missouri, Field Reporting on the Food System explores the “ethical dimensions of the food system” and includes a “multi-day field trip.”
  • At the University of Florida, Fashion Reporting offers no course description online, but it mentions this: “The instructor has stated that there are no textbooks required or recommended.”

I’m…

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Yes! I was just recently talking about the porn hub that Instagram has become and now all these articles begin to pop up everywhere!

Ideas

When I was in high school, someone took a photo of me in our school’s production of a Tom Stoppard play. For some reason my character was on her hands and knees in a ballroom-dancing outfit. One of my friends asked me if he could borrow the photo, to prove to another girl, he said, that I was in the school play. I never saw it again. I thought little of it. To me it was a funny photo of me in a pink dress. To the testosterone-charged boys among whom it circulated, it was a photo of cleavage. How do I know this? Years later my husband told me. He saw the photo.

I was lucky. There was just one photo as color copies were too expensive for school-age boys. The damage was pretty much limited to one zipcode. And I was dressed. But today, capturing and preserving a…

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Fixing my resume and as I’m searching for tips, I stumble upon Koretzky’s blog once again (last year I found it when I was also looking for tips).

journoterrorist

No writing assignment strikes fear into the cold, calloused heart of a college journalist quite like the resume does. Yet no assignment is so shoddily reported and so clumsily written.

Every spring semester for nearly a decade, I’ve collected resumes from the staff at the student newspaper I advise – and I’ve taken them to local, state, and national media pros for a blistering critique. Every year, only a handful don’t suck.

Of course, the top reason for a crappy college resume is simply a lack of journalism experience. Too many j-school grads think they can land a media job with a diploma in one hand and some class assignments in the other. (For more on that, see 9 Mistakes that Crush a College Journalist’s Career.)

But even if your experience is impeccable, you can easily lose that first job you’d otherwise be destined for. Here’s why…



1. A…

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